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Hospital Errors Remain Too Common Because of Doctor Deficiencies

The high rate of hospital medical errors has been acknowledged in all quarters of the health-care industry, and we’ve certainly done our share of blogging about it (“Why Can’t Hospitals Clean Up Their Medical Errors?”). Certain measures, such as the federal government’s error-reporting systems have been developed to address the problem.

Read more at Protect Patients Blog.

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Nutrition Suddenly a Hot Topic for Hospitals

Last week, Dayton Children’s Hospital in Ohio did what a number of pediatric hospitals across the country have done recently — it announced that it would stop selling sugar-sweetened soda and sports drinks at all of its locations. The policy, which takes effect May 1, applies to the hospital’s cafeteria…

Read more at H&HN.

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UC Hospital Workers Approve Strike

Unionized technical workers at University of California’s five hospitals plan to go on strike March 24, according to a Venice-MarVista Patch report. About 13,000 employees, members of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees Local 3299, authorized a strike with 97 percent support in a vote last week…

Read more at Becker’s Hospital Review.

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Why hospital CEO turnover is on the rise

Hospital CEO turnover reached an all time high of 20 percent in 2013. Experts cite a variety of causes for the uptick, according to MedCityNews. As the healthcare industry consolidates and cuts costs, many executives may retire earlier than they have in past decades, Dona Padilla, a senior partner at Witt/Kiefer, told MedCityNews…

Read more FierceHealthcare.

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Hospital CEO Turnover Hits Record High

The churn rate for hospital CEOs fluctuated between 14% and 18% for a decade, but spiked to 20% last year, the American College of Healthcare Executives says. One-in-five hospital chief executive officers churned through the job in 2013, a record rate of turnover, according to the American College of Healthcare Executives…

Read more at HealthLeaders Media.

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Computerized safety checklist shows threefold drop in rates serious type of hospital-acquired infection

A computerized safety checklist that automatically pulls information from patients’ electronic medical records was associated with a threefold drop in rates of one serious type of hospital-acquired infection, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford…

Read more at News Medical.